Skip to content

  • SEPA - Still engulfing payment agendas?

    Monday, January 17, 2011

    Another New Year, but still the same old SEPA discussion – when? If? Whilst the industry is inching forward, with the draft of the regulation proposing the migration to SEPA schemes published in Dec 2010, there is still along way to go and the hard work doesn’t stop there for anyone. Based on the conversations that I’m having with clients, there are some points worth remembering.

  • On your marks for SEPA

    Thursday, December 16, 2010

    The European Commission has today published proposals for the setting of end dates for the migration from legacy instruments to SEPA credit transfers and direct debits. It’s taken a while but there has now been a ceremonial bowing to the inevitable.

  • A post-Sibos perspective on SEPA

    Saturday, December 11, 2010

    Against all the odds, SEPA remained an active topic of discussion at Sibos in Amsterdam, with a degree of clarity about the specific issues of migration not usual in the SEPA debates of late. At least the imminent setting of a SEPA migration end date(s) is anticipated - with eagerness or trepidation depending on your point of view and preparedness.

  • The changing nature of fraud

    Tuesday, December 07, 2010

    The reduction in fraud levels seen in Australia once again reiterate the potential savings that can be delivered if countries roll out EMV technology, and it will be interesting to see if the current non-EMV countries such as the US reconsider their stance as these stories continue to come through.

  • Success factors for in-house card processing

    Monday, December 06, 2010

    I recently posted on the brand, customer and risk-mitigating advantages of bringing card processing in house. However, while an in-house card processing strategy clearly presents a set of indisputable strategic and global business advantages, there are risks to consider.

  • In-house card processing: reducing costs and risks

    Thursday, December 02, 2010

    I recently posted on how bringing credit card processing in house can help build a financial institution’s brand and customer loyalty. For banks with in-house processing and advanced fraud detection systems, another advantage is the ability to mitigate brand and business risk around privacy and security issues.

  • Why bring card processing in house?

    Tuesday, November 30, 2010

    While outsourcing continues to be a trend this year, in terms of card processing there are far-reaching business and financial advantages to bringing the process in house. On the one hand, the economics of outsourcing can be competitive when looking at the low cost per unit in post mature market segments like consumer credit cards

  • Not Just Another Manic Monday

    Monday, November 29, 2010

    According to Kelkoo – the online retail comparison website – and Visa Europe, Monday 29 November is the busiest online shopping day of the year. Visa Europe expects 3.8m purchases worth £265m to be made using Visa cards and Kelkoo says that online shoppers are expected to spend £537m on Christmas gifts today.

  • The Credit Card in Germany

    Wednesday, November 24, 2010

    It is good news that credit cards are the most popular payment method in German e-commerce for the first time. It’s also interesting that 2010 has seen a significant growth in the number of credit cards being issued in Germany with organisations such as Deutcshe Bahn and others starting to co-brand credit cards again. For example, LandesBank Baden Wüttenberg has issued a card with the football team VfB Stuttgart, which can be used at the stadium. In addition, Postbank, Targobank and Santander Consumer Bank in Germany have also grown significantly having pushed their credit card offerings and upped their sales activities.

  • Direct Debit Fraud at an All Time High

    Tuesday, November 23, 2010

    It is worthwhile remembering that there is actually more than one victim involved in Direct Debit fraud. The Paying Bank executes the payment against a fraudulent direct debit mandate, and the Collecting Bank receives the fraudulent payment, whose customer provides goods and services – for simplicity let's assume they are in fact legitimate in the first place.