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Displaying 111 - 120 of 122 Transaction Banking blog posts

  • SEPA Who Will Step Up To The Challenge

    Friday, July 23, 2010

    Comments from Gerard Hartsink in the latest EPC newsletter underline the plight of the SEPA Schemes – ultimately that we're in danger of ending up with a politically-driven mess. At Sibos 2008 I blogged that to achieve success, a third party body needed to step in to oversee the SEPA project. Almost two years later, what this newsletter highlights more than ever is that SEPA is a huge and complex undertaking which still lacks a central project manager.

  • Uncertainty Piled on Uncertainty: The SEPA Story

    Friday, June 18, 2010

    The journey towards SEPA has been dogged by uncertainty from the start. End-users have not been sure what is on offer from the banks and at what price. Banks have been unsure whether and how to invest in SEPA, unsure about the impact of regulation (especially the PSD), and unsure how the financial crisis might affect their plans or lack of them. Then they have dithered about Additional Optional Services: are they a necessity or a luxury, and how should they best be deployed? And the whole market has been unsure about the adoption of the new SEPA instruments: when and by how much?

  • SEPA and White Elephants

    Monday, June 07, 2010

    If one was to take a spectator’s view of SEPA progress to date, one could be excused if the image of a white elephant flashed before one’s eyes . . . . .

  • EBADay 2010: How Far we have come and where we are going?

    Friday, May 28, 2010

    Yesterday was the first day of EBAday and, as expected, many of the sessions focused on the challenges that banks are currently facing as they integrate SEPA with their domestic payments infrastructures while they migrate from legacy payments, ultimately turning the SEPA vision into reality. EBAday is an opportunity to reflect on the progress of SEPA, the milestones we’ve reached and the challenges that still lie ahead. From that perspective, several interesting observations have been made.

  • Grafting SEPA Onto Legacy Payments An Ongoing Challenge

    Monday, May 24, 2010

    We’re expecting the agenda at the upcoming EBAday event this week to again be dominated by SEPA. The challenges banks face integrating SEPA with their domestic payments infrastructures, migrating from legacy payments, and ultimately turning the SEPA vision into reality will be top priorities.

  • SEPA Procrastination

    Thursday, May 13, 2010

    As we approach the mid point of the year, it’s obvious that, despite the many and varied calls for an end date for the use of legacy payment instruments, procrastination is the order of the day, and the European payments industry stumbles on towards some indeterminate SEPA goal.

  • Lack of Respect for Payments Business Exposed by SEPA

    Wednesday, April 14, 2010

    It is axiomatic that banks have traditionally had problems in measuring their payments business and the value it brings to their bottom line. Are payments just a means to securing a corporate’s DDA or current account? Are they merely an adjunct to credit relationships? Or do they in fact have an intrinsic value which could do far more than adding a marginal improvement to the bottom line?

  • Life is Strange and so is SEPA

    Friday, March 26, 2010

    As we dally in Europe with double-dip recession or recovery, and the Greek financial woes, life is indeed strange at the moment. And so is our attitude towards SEPA.

  • Day Three at the International Payments Summit

    Thursday, March 11, 2010

    This year’s International Payments Summit had a clear theme running through the various debates and discussions around the event: how regulation is stifling progress….but mainly for the banks.

  • Day Two at the International Payments Summit

    Wednesday, March 10, 2010

    While we were eased into this year’s International Payments Summit on Monday, yesterday’s sessions contained more heated debates. Discussions yesterday first of all turned to proposed Basel III regulations which will require far more capital to be raised by the banks (a core capital ratio of at least 6 per cent will have to be maintained). According to a number of projections from major financial institutions, this means that the European banking sector as a whole will have an aggregate extra funding requirement of more than one trillion Euros, or nearly one and a half trillion dollars, to comply with Basel III.

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